Sunday, March 6, 2011

Formula vs. Breastfeeding: You might think it doesn't, but it does concern YOU!

While reading a website about the benefits of breastfeeding today I found some really interesting information and I decided to share it on my facebook wall and on Instinctual Mamas wall:
Repost this on your walls to try to encourage ALL people to support breastfeeding:
Think breastfeeding has no impact on your life because you don't have children or you're not a woman? Think again. Here's a great reason for YOU to support breastfeeding women. If all WIC babies in the U.S. were breastfed, our economical savings would be $33,000,000 per month. Yes, BILLIONS every year.
It made me want to blog...
Imagine what the government could do with all of that money? Especially when you take into consideration not only the cost of formula itself but the excess healthcare costs for illnesses in formula-fed infants (e.g., office visits, hospitalizations, and prescriptions.) In 2001, the USDA concluded that if breastfeeding rates were increased to 75 percent at birth and 50 percent at six months, it would lead to a national government savings of a minimum of $3.6 billion. This amount was easily an underestimation since it represents savings in the treatment of only three of the dozens of illnesses proven to be decreased by breastfeeding: ear infections, gastroenteritis, and necrotizing enterocolitis.
The AAP says each formula-fed infant costs the healthcare system between $331 and $475 more than a breastfed baby in its first year of life. The cost of treating respiratory viruses resulting from not breastfeeding is $225 million a year.
I can go on and on about the benefits of breastfeeding but I will leave it at that and let these numbers speak for themselves.
Now EVERYONE who lives in this country and pays taxes has every reason to support every breastfeeding Mother he sees or speaks to. Breastfeeding might not interest you or be your passion like it is mine but you can make a difference. Whether it's just reposting this blog or telling someone about it or giving a nursing Mama thumbs up, be supportive! It will make an impact.

Added today 3/7/11 after I saw a few debates about this on facebook:
If you think that this post is saying something negative about people who are on WIC you're reading it wrong. It's just a fact. It's just numbers.
The fac...t of the matter is if more women had support to breastfeed they might make the decisi...on to breastfeed instead of formula feed since breastmilk is free for everyone thus costing the government less money that they could "hopefully" put to better use. We just want more support, if you haven't breastfed you would be surprised to learn how hard breastfeeding can be when you don't have support, its the most unnatural natural thing in the US where only about 25-30% of women breastfeed.
By saying that bottle feeding costs taxpayers money it puts it into a different perspective for the average Joe Shmoe who never thought it affected him. Maybe next time he will make more of an effort to make his employee more comfortable while nursing at work and possibly give her more time to pump. Maybe he will give the next nursing Mother he sees a thumbs up instead of looking away or giving a dirty look.

I'm very passionate about breastfeeding and I'm trying to make a difference and I believe I will. My blog has been viewed almost 400 times (scratch that-800 times!) since I posted it last night and it was shared on facebook almost 300 times so if just one Joe Shmoe changes his perspective on breastfeeding and is kinder to just one breastfeeding Mother, I have made a difference ♥

16 comments:

  1. Can you post the reference to the $33 million/month WIC number? This is exactly the info I need for my upcoming speech. Thank you!

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  2. I did, it's the blue word on top that says website :)

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  3. Another wonderful reason why I am glad I have EBF'd for 8 months and counting!

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  4. We're on WIC (military living overseas) and I EBF'd until 6 months and still breastfeeding my 15 month old (he's had water but no cow's milk). I took NO offense whatsoever to your post and anyone who did obviously mis-read it. Loving this blog!!

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  5. Not to nitpick, but it would not be billions. Not that $396 million isn't still a TON of money, but it's not billions.

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  6. Lisa, you're right, that was bad math on my part and I realized that but I left it because I saw this: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/Parenting/19367

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  7. My daughter and I used WIC, and I took no offense to your statements. I do want to say that I was very impressed with the breastfeeding support I received through WIC. They tried their best to inform and encourage the mothers to breastfeed. There was a class on breastfeeding that was encouraged before you had the baby. After the baby, they had assistance and advice available any time it was needed: I could go into their office any day and see a breastfeeding consultant, they provided a free breast pump for as long as I needed it, a BF consultant called me weekly to see how everything was going and if I had any questions or needed any assistance. It was a wonderful experience and, after getting off to a very rocky start, made it possible for me to BF my daughter until she no-longer wanted it @ 10 months. I was bummed when she ended it, but I have an independent child, what can I say?

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  8. That is awesome Linzi! I love hearing stories like that about WIC. They seem to be few and far between though. Some of them just ask if you're planning on breastfeeding or formula feeding and hang up some signs saying breast is best and thats the extent of it. What WIC do you go to?

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  9. i am reading this blog and nursing my almost 18 month old to sleep....i am in tears bc i wish more women CHOSE to experience this beautiful gift we have been given. i will repost!!!

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  10. oh yeah and FTR i used wic up until this month actually and i was like a walking miracle in there....i think i was the first woman they ever saw nurse a baby past a few months...or thats how they made me feel anyway!

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  11. This is great post! I will be sharing:-)

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  12. Hi, i live in the UK and BF my nearly 3 year old. He still has a normal diet "boobie" is now just for emotional comfort when tiered, scared or in a strange place.

    In the the UK low income families are give formula milk for free (vouchers) and other than the midwife at delivery no one is aloud to challenge a parent on the subject. A lot of new mums admit to using formula because it was there and it was free. Friends of mine also admit if they had to pay the full price of £8 a tin they would have made more of a effort to try breast feeding.

    By choosing to breast feed I've saved the government over £1200 in less than 3 years. I wonder if i could get a tax rebate for that????

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  13. That's great Linz! I'm still nursing my 2 year old also. A tax rebate for breastfeeding moms is an awesome idea!!! I wish the US government would do something smart like that!

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  14. Very good and informative ideas can you give me some more ideas like that Christening gifts .

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